Postdoc opportunity at Institute for Disease Modeling

Ben Althouse, PhD, ScM, is actively looking for a postdoc to join the epidemiology team at IDM. There are several projects available to work on with a theme of joint behavior/transmission modeling. The job description is here:
If you know of someone looking for a postdoc, please encourage them to apply! Any questions can be sent to
balthouse@idmod.or

Symposium on Population Biology of Vector-borne Diseases at the Odum School of Ecology February 24, 2018.

Registration Open & Travel Scholarship Available
The Center for the Ecology of Infectious Diseases at the University of Georgia is pleased to announce that a scholarship has been established to support student travel to our symposium, Population Biology of Vector-borne Diseases, which will be held at the Odum School of Ecology on February 24, 2018.  This event is a great opportunity for faculty and students to hear from leaders in the fields of biology, ecology, veterinary medicine, entomology, epidemiology, biostatistics, and geography, whose work focuses on the rapidly growing field of vector-borne diseases.
For more information on our speakers, topics, and scholarship, visit our website

The Reece lab at the University of Edinburgh is recruiting a postdoc

The Reece lab in the Institutes of Evolution, Immunology and Infection Research, University of Edinburgh, is recruiting a postdoc.

Topic: Parasite offence or host defence? The ecology and evolution of biological rhythms in malaria infection

Details and application information: https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=042288

Biological rhythms allow activities to be coordinated with the consequences of the Earth’s daily and seasonal rotation. The mechanisms underpinning the clocks that drive daily rhythms are well understood. In contrast, the costs and benefits provided by daily rhythms – including how rhythms shape interactions between organisms – are poorly understood. One of the most fundamental interactions between organisms is that between hosts and parasites. Why parasites – that exclusively live within the bodies of other organisms – exhibit biological rhythms and how they are regulated are longstanding questions. Examining the roles of rhythms in disease is a new arena for studying host-parasite-vector coevolution. Also, integrating disease control interventions into an evolutionary chronobiology framework offers innovative approaches to improving health. This includes the development of drugs to disrupt parasite rhythms, harnessing circadian systems to enhance immune responses, or precisely timing drug administration to make treatment more effective.

We are offering a postdoctoral position as part of a Wellcome Trust funded project to investigate the role of circadian rhythms in malaria infection. The project will integrate a novel mix of disciplines (evolutionary ecology, chronobiology, and parasitology) to determine why and how timing matters for interactions between parasites, hosts and vectors, the severity and transmission of disease, and fitness of all parties. This is a very broad topic and so the successful candidate will be encouraged to develop their own niche. Growing evidence that the daily rhythms of malaria parasites can confer tolerance to antimalarial drugs, and that the use of bed nets is changing the biting time of the mosquitoes that transmit malaria makes understanding how and why parasites exhibit daily rhythms increasingly urgent.

This interdisciplinary Wellcome Trust funded project will break new ground by elucidating the evolutionary ecology of biological rhythms for parasites. It will integrate a novel mix of disciplines (evolutionary ecology, chronobiology, and parasitology) and open up novel avenues for disease control. The post holder will plan, conduct and write up research that they have led and support the research of others in the lab. The project will focus on a rodent malaria, murine host, and mosquito vector model system.

This post is full time and fixed term for 3 years.

Salary: £32,548 – £38,833 per annum

Closing Date: Friday 02 February 2018 at 5pm (GMT)

Please get in touch if you are interested and have questions: Sarah.Reece@ed.ac.uk

Pertussis workshop at the Santa Fe Institute March 21-24 2016

RE-EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES: THE CHALLENGE AND OPPORTUNITY OF PERTUSSIS

Click here to read more on Santa Fe Institute’s website

SFIAbstract:  Complex systems paradigms, such as critical slowing down, regime shifts, systems theory, and computational forecasting, have taken center stage in the global effort to predict and mitigate emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Such approaches are predicated on models integrating information collected typically at microscopic scales and extrapolating macro-scale phenomena, such as bifurcation, percolation, and persistence. Complex systems perspectives and methodologies are essential as we come to grips with the ecology, immunology, and evolution of complicated infectious disease systems. Pertussis offers a prime example of this in the context of a scientific problem of great timeliness and importance.

The current re-emergence of pertussis, once seemingly on track to eradication, is enigmatic, due largely to its complexity as a host/pathogen system. In particular, the dynamics of pertussis are shaped by the interplay of pathogen transmission, host immunity, host contact-network structure, pathogen evolution, and public-health intervention across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales and levels of biological organization. Globally, trends and cycles in pertussis prevalence are idiosyncratic, due to variations in human behavior, geographic transmission bottlenecks, and dynamic variation in the nature and extent of public health intervention. The resulting scientific contention can only be resolved by theory capable of reconciling disparate, and seemingly contradictory, observations. Key elements of such a theory necessarily include: heterogeneities in immunity, age- and spatially-structured contact networks, dynamism in contact-network structure at behavioral time-scales, and large exogenous perturbations due to vaccination campaigns and behavior changes. Simplified versions of such theoretical systems display (1) prolonged transient dynamics which can contain signatures of the mode and efficacy of immunological protection, (2) sensitivity to contact-network structure, (3) prominent interactions between nonlinear and stochastic effects, and (4) manifold potential for counterintuitive emergent effects resulting from the above. The intellectual aim of the workshop will be to develop a complex-systems theory of pertussis within an inferential framework suitable for confronting models directly with extant data drawn from epidemiology, behavior, and immunology. This theory, and the techniques used to test it, will be readily generalizable to other disease systems because our efforts to resolve the causes and consequences of pertussis’ resurgence will necessarily be focused on the essential theoretical questions at issue in complex eco-epidemiological systems generally.

 

Clay Cressler tells us about his Research Exchange!

In June, I had the opportunity to spend two weeks in Princeton working with Andrea Graham and two postdocs, Sarah Budischak and Anieke van Leeuwen. The purpose of this visit was two-fold: (1) develop a mathematical model of within-host dynamics incorporating host immune responses, non-immune physiological processes (e.g., growth, storage), and parasite exploitation and growth; (2) use this model as a basis for identifying key experimental measurements to quantify the effect of diet on host and parasite fitness. This exchange stemmed from a theory paper I published last year showing that increased host resources could either increase or decrease parasite fitness, depending on the structure of the resource-immune-parasite interaction. Dr. Graham and Dr. Budischak initially contacted me to ask about extending the model to consider the role of host diet in driving within-host dynamics of macroparasites, focusing on understanding when host response should focus on tolerance over resistance. Out of this conversation, I developed an RCN proposal more broadly considering how diet links within-host and between-host scales to shape both host immune phenotype and parasite exploitation.

The research exchange was structured around daily meetings between the four of us. I would typically spend the day working in Dr. Graham’s lab alongside Dr. Budischak, who is primarily trained as an immunologist. This work environment allowed me to get instantaneous feedback as I was developing the model. During the first week of the exchange, the daily meetings were primarily spent defining, discussing, defending, and refining a biologically reasonable model structure. This was one of the most useful aspects of the process for me, as my knowledge of immunology is limited. As the model development proceeded, Dr. Budischak searched the biomedical literature for estimates of model parameters. This process helped identify key parameters that need to be quantified from subsequent Graham lab experiments. During the second week of the exchange, the focus shifted to model analysis (both analytical and numerical). This analysis helped further hone the search for parameter values and showed that the model is capable of producing both host tolerance and host resistance.

I am hopeful (and reasonably confident) that this research exchange has resulted in a profitable long-term collaboration. Already we have used results from this exchange in two grant proposals. The current plan is to use the data from mouse-helminth experiments to develop an empirically validated model of within-host dynamics and then use this model to study the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of both the host and parasite, focusing on questions like: (1) can diet shift parasites from being resource-limited to immune-limited, and does each type of limitation have a dynamical signature at the between-host scale? and (2) when do cross-scale interactions give rise to self-reinforcing feedbacks, such as the “negative spiral” of malnutrition and infection?

UGA’s Odum School of Ecology seeks postdoc associate!

The Odum School of Ecology at the University of Georgia is initiating a new track for doctoral training in Interdisciplinary Disease Ecology Across Scales. A postdoctoral associate is being sought to assist with curriculum development, student evaluation, and assessment.

Applicants must have a Ph.D. in either (1) ecology, evolution, or other field related to infectious disease biology (e.g., immunology, microbiology) or (2) education (with a strong emphasis and background in biology). Applicants are expected to have experience or a genuine interest in instruction, education research, or evaluation and assessment at the post-secondary level.

For more details about the position and how to apply please visit:

Click here for more information and to apply

A research exchange success story!

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In April Nina Wale, an empiricist at Penn State University, collaborated with Aaron King, a theoretical evolutionary ecologist at the University of Michigan.

Experiments conducted by Wale have revealed that varying the availability of a micronutrient in the blood alters the infection dynamics in the mouse malaria model Plasmodium chabaudi. Importantly, her nutrient manipulations altered the dynamics during a period of the infection that has proven difficult to model and is associated with an augmentation of the host immune response. With these data in hand, Wale and King hoped to shed light on the determinants of parasite population dynamics and on how parasites interact with the host immune response. The research exchange gave Wale and King an opportunity to work intensely to build a model that could describe the data. Wale, an empiricist, learned how the models they made worked ‘under the hood’ and developed her programming skills. A number of hypotheses about the underlying causes of malaria infection dynamics have emerged from their modeling work and they are designing experiments to test them. They hope to continue using theory and data in combination to broaden our understanding of how parasite traits and the host immune response interact to create the characteristic dynamics of malaria infections.